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mesh editing


dfhill
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Hello.

I have a very large fort.14 grid. I would like to create a new grid based upon a small subset of the area. I have tried converting the nodestrings to arcs and the mesh to scatterpoint. My idea was then to edit the arcs and then re-mesh. However, I have found that SMS is excruciatingly slow when I try to select vertices and then delete them from the main coastline arc. I have several thousand points to delete (my original grid was for the entire west coast of the US; I am trying to create a new sub-mesh based upon a much smaller (state scale) scale.

Dave.

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How many elements are in your original fort.14 grid?

What meshing option(s) do you use to create your mesh? If you use scalar density paving, the spacing of vertices isn't critical and you can have more or less than you have.

The ADCIRC authors generally recommend keeping a large grid and refining in the area of interest. This keeps the boundary conditions far from the area of interest and provides the opportunity for large scale effects. If you use your original conceptual model and use scalar density paving to refine where needed it might be faster than what you are doing.

If you want to change the distribution of vertices for a whole arc you can use the redistribute vertices command to give a specified spacing to the vertices. This can even be done with multiple arcs.

I hope the above help. If not, please respond and we'll see if there is something else we can think of to try.

Hello.

I have a very large fort.14 grid. I would like to create a new grid based upon a small subset of the area. I have tried converting the nodestrings to arcs and the mesh to scatterpoint. My idea was then to edit the arcs and then re-mesh. However, I have found that SMS is excruciatingly slow when I try to select vertices and then delete them from the main coastline arc. I have several thousand points to delete (my original grid was for the entire west coast of the US; I am trying to create a new sub-mesh based upon a much smaller (state scale) scale.

Dave.

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rusty,

I'm very experienced in creating grids for adcirc. My question is more about how to quickly grab only a sub-mesh out of a large existing mesh (just for demonstration purposes). I want to basically 'snip' or 'trim' the coastline boundary, only keeping a small portion of it. Then, based upon the existing bathymetry, I just want to regenerate a mesh for that much smaller domain.

I CAN just start from scratch, getting the coastline from the coastline extractor, but I was just trying to save a bit of time.

Dave.

Hello.

I have a very large fort.14 grid. I would like to create a new grid based upon a small subset of the area. I have tried converting the nodestrings to arcs and the mesh to scatterpoint. My idea was then to edit the arcs and then re-mesh. However, I have found that SMS is excruciatingly slow when I try to select vertices and then delete them from the main coastline arc. I have several thousand points to delete (my original grid was for the entire west coast of the US; I am trying to create a new sub-mesh based upon a much smaller (state scale) scale.

Dave.

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I think you were on the right track before with creating nodestrings and doing a mesh->map to get them into a conceptual model. You could even create new nodestrings specifically for the purpose of generating arcs in the interior of the domain.

When you copy over the new arcs, try to avoid deleting individual vertices. You can create new arcs to enclose parts of the domain. Creating an arc that snaps to an existing arc will split the existing arc into two. Delete any unnecessary arcs (outside the new domain you want to work with). Redistribute vertices by selecting the arcs you want to redistribute and choose Feature Objects | Redistribute vertices. If you can use the redistribute command, you will avoid selecting and deleting individual or small numbers of vertices by hand.

When selecting arcs, you may want to use the modifier keys in order to more easily select multiple arcs at once see http://xmswiki.com/xms/SMS:Dynamic_Tools.

I still think the best approach with ADCIRC is to start with a conceptual model, use scalar density paving and create new size functions to refine in areas of interest without changing the original extents of the mesh. However, you should be able to use the tools outlined above to do what you are trying to do.

Also, which version of SMS are you using? The newer versions of SMS have had work done to try to make some of the above steps work more quickly.

rusty,

I'm very experienced in creating grids for adcirc. My question is more about how to quickly grab only a sub-mesh out of a large existing mesh (just for demonstration purposes). I want to basically 'snip' or 'trim' the coastline boundary, only keeping a small portion of it. Then, based upon the existing bathymetry, I just want to regenerate a mesh for that much smaller domain.

I CAN just start from scratch, getting the coastline from the coastline extractor, but I was just trying to save a bit of time.

Dave.

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Thanks, Rusty. I have sms 10. I have tried to follow your suggestions below, but I am unable to do so. The wiki link below does not work. It is one of my great frustrations with sms that the supporting documentation is so thin. I'll keep trying...

D.

I think you were on the right track before with creating nodestrings and doing a mesh->map to get them into a conceptual model. You could even create new nodestrings specifically for the purpose of generating arcs in the interior of the domain.

When you copy over the new arcs, try to avoid deleting individual vertices. You can create new arcs to enclose parts of the domain. Creating an arc that snaps to an existing arc will split the existing arc into two. Delete any unnecessary arcs (outside the new domain you want to work with). Redistribute vertices by selecting the arcs you want to redistribute and choose Feature Objects | Redistribute vertices. If you can use the redistribute command, you will avoid selecting and deleting individual or small numbers of vertices by hand.

When selecting arcs, you may want to use the modifier keys in order to more easily select multiple arcs at once see http://xmswiki.com/xms/SMS:Dynamic_Tools.

I still think the best approach with ADCIRC is to start with a conceptual model, use scalar density paving and create new size functions to refine in areas of interest without changing the original extents of the mesh. However, you should be able to use the tools outlined above to do what you are trying to do.

Also, which version of SMS are you using? The newer versions of SMS have had work done to try to make some of the above steps work more quickly.

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I think you should download a 30 day trial of SMS 10.1 and give it a try. If you still run into trouble, contact technical support. If you get them your files, tell them what you are trying to do, and tell them what doesn't seem to work right they can take a look and we can get to the bottom of this.

Thanks, Rusty. I have sms 10. I have tried to follow your suggestions below, but I am unable to do so. The wiki link below does not work. It is one of my great frustrations with sms that the supporting documentation is so thin. I'll keep trying...

D.

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