Jump to content
GMS, SMS, and WMS User Forum

Chris Smemoe

WMS Development Team
  • Content count

    332
  • Joined

  • Last visited

  • Days Won

    2

Chris Smemoe last won the day on March 1 2011

Chris Smemoe had the most liked content!

Community Reputation

1 Neutral

1 Follower

About Chris Smemoe

  • Rank
    WMS Development Team Leader

Contact Methods

  • ICQ
    0

Profile Information

  • Gender
    Male
  • Location
    Provo, UT

Recent Profile Visitors

16,208 profile views
  1. Import HEC-HMS to WMS

    WMS does not currently have the option to import an HMS file. If you have an HEC-1 file, you can read this into WMS using the HEC-1 menu. There is no reason we could not support an option to import an HMS file, and I have added this request to our list of tasks, but implementing the option to fully import an HMS file will take some time. Your only option right now, if you want to get it into WMS, would be to try to duplicate the model in the WMS interface. Chris
  2. Automated HEC-HMS Data Entry

    Julie, This is kind of a difficult question. It's been a long time since I've worked specifically on DSS files. HEC-DSSVue is the most comprehensive tool out there for viewing and editing DSS files. It seems like there is an import from text file (.csv) function that would allow you to convert several months of data to a DSS file using DSSVue. If there is not, you might have to either copy/paste the data manually as you are doing or write a program using VB or some other programming language to convert the data using one of the heclib DLL's. You can find some limited information about the heclib DLL's by searching on the internet. One version of the heclib DLL's (heclib50.dll) is included with the WMS download. We use the heclib DLL for writing DSS files for HMS models from WMS. I can answer specific questions about programming for the heclib DLL if you are not able to find a solution with HEC-DSSVue. My guess is that HEC-DSSVue should be flexible enough for you do what you need to do however. Chris
  3. Hi, Sorry about the problem you're having. Did your model run to completion? I'm not sure exactly what's causing the problem, and I've never heard of somebody with this problem. I'd try moving your HEC-RAS project file so it's not on a network (to a place such as your "C" drive). This might fix the problem. If it does not, I'd recommend contacting Aquaveo Tech support with your files and a description of your problem. Their contact information is here. Let me know if I can help with anything else. Chris
  4. This error comes up if WMS does not have the location of your cross section database or if there are no cross sections or an error reading the database. I'd recommend double-clicking on your cross sections and making sure cross sections geometry is defined for each of your cross section arcs. If there's an arc without any cross section geometry defined or if there's an error loading the cross section database, that's your problem. You might have to re-extract all the cross sections to a new cross section database if some of the cross sections do not have geometry. Hope this helps, Chris
  5. Multiple Basins and Hydrographs (GSSHA)

    Yes, there is an option for Hydrograph output that will show up as the 3rd column in the point/node attributes window if you have defined your 1D Hydraulic Model channels (trapezoidal or cross sections) on arcs in the map module and define the Diffusive Wave routing option in the GSSHA Job Control dialog. Turn this option on to generate hydrographs at any point in your 1D stream network. Chris
  6. Gina, If you can get your materials file from SRH2D into a WMS "Area Property" coverage, WMS will get the Manning's roughness values from this coverage when you extract the geometry for your cross sections. To extract the geometry for your cross sections, you need a 1D Hydraulic Centerline and a 1D Hydraulic Cross Section coverage in WMS. In the centerline coverage, you would define your stream centerlines and your bank lines (bank lines are optional, but recommended). In the cross section coverage, you define your cross section locations. I think you're saying you've already created these coverages or layers in Civil 3D and you don't want to create them again. If you have your HEC-RAS geometry file, you can export a GIS Export file from HEC-RAS and read this file into WMS. The 1D Centerline and Cross Section coverages will be created if you do this, but you will need to re-extract the cross sections (including the geometry) to assign Manning's roughness values in your Area property coverage to your cross sections. Here are the steps for doing this: 1. In the HEC-RAS main window, select File | Export GIS Data... 2. Turn on the options to export your User Defined Cross Sections and your Bank Stations and select Export Data. 3. In WMS, open the .sdf file as a HEC-RAS .geo file. Just select File | Open and select HEC-RAS GEO file from the window that comes up and select OK. 4. Enter a filename for the cross section database file. The default filename is probably OK. 5. Go to your 1D cross section coverage and select River Tools | Cross Sections->TIN. 6. Bring in your Manning's roughness areas as an area property coverage. Make sure you have polygons in this covearge, make sure you have defined Materials (Edit | Materials), and make sure you have a material assigned to each polygon in the coverage. 7. Now go to your 1D cross section coverage and select River Tools | Extract Cross Section... 8. Generate your point properties from the arcs in the Centerline coverage and Generate your line properties from your Area Property coverage and select OK. 9. Now go to the Hydraulic Modeling Module, HEC-RAS menu and define your Manning's roughness values under the Material properties for each material type. You also want to set your model control to use the Materials (under the HEC-RAS menu, there's a Model Control menu item for doing this). Hope this helps, Chris
  7. Hi, There is a way to re-extract and update only selected cross sections but it's not an easy procedure and would require you to edit some of the WMS .map and cross section database files using a text editor. I guess I don't really recommend this approach. I guess you have a couple of options. One is the approach you mention, where you extend any cross sections that don't intersect the bank lines so they're beyond the bank lines. This would require you to re-extract all your cross sections, and your edits based on survey data would be deleted. You would need to re-enter your survey data for each of your cross sections in this case. This should not be too difficult since you should already have the survey data saved as a cross section database file. It would just be time-consuming, especially if you have lots of cross sections. Another approach is to edit each cross section's geometry and point properties by going to the cross section attributes | Assign Cross Section | Edit and then adding the left and right bank stations manually into the Point Props window. The drawback of this method is that your left and right overbank lengths will not be computed by WMS for the cross sections where the left and right banks are manually defined. When you run HEC-RAS, you will get an error message for each of these cross sections. You can then compute the left and right overbank lengths for these cross sections using the measure tool in WMS. You would have to re-enter these lengths in HEC-RAS each time you export your model from WMS. So it may be worth it to you to update your cross section arcs in WMS, re-extract the cross sections, and re-merge your surveyed cross sections, but that's up to you. I agree that it would be nice to just update selected cross sections in your cross section database file, but this option is not yet available in WMS. Hope this helps, Chris
  8. Land Use Legend

    Thanks for the input. I have noticed this also. I added a request to create a fill box for the color legend. This should be fixed in a future download of WMS.
  9. Export/Import HEC-HMS elements

    Anything is possible, but this would be difficult or impossible to do just using the HMS interface. You'd probably have to edit the HMS text files using a text editor or use WMS to combine models somehow. Chris
  10. I had another few thoughts on this issue you're having with the cross sections. I will insert some of your original questions: I don't have any general rules of thumb, though I think you can generally assume that your surveyed cross sections are more correct than your extracted cross sections. Since your surveyed cross sections are more correct than your extracted cross sections, I think you can assume that you can line up your cross sections using the east bank, as in screen shot B. This is assuming that your surveyed cross sections extend to the east bank as extracted from the DEM. It could be that your surveyed cross section extends only to a certain point (not to the bank point) on the extracted cross section. In this case, you would line up the east bank of your survey cross section at that same point on your extracted cross section. If you have good elevation values on your surveyed cross section, you could approximate the location of this point along your extracted cross section. Yes, I think the odd shape will impact your RAS model. You want your cross sections to be as similar as possible from one cross section to the next downstream cross section in your model. This is especially true for running an unsteady RAS model, where abrupt changes in cross section geometry can cause model instabilities. You could try filtering/removing points along your extracted cross section using the filter tool in the cross section attributes dialog or just by removing them manually before merging cross sections. It looks like you have lots of points in your channel cross section. This can be a good thing, but can be problematic if you're trying to merge cross sections where the geometry does not match. I hope this helps, Chris
  11. I don't have any general rules of thumb regarding which bank to use to align your cross section in your model. I can tell you how to fix the problem you're having with the strange shape when you insert the survey cross section based on the lower bank. One way to fix this is to add an additional point to your survey cross section so your cross section is long enough to be inserted into your extracted cross section without any gaps. I don't know if this makes sense. You should probably always use the "Insert All" option when merging instead of the "Blend All" option when merging. Hope this helps, I'll think more about which bank station to use and if anything comes to me I'll reply to this thread. Chris
  12. Lag time for HEC elements

    There are various ways of computing the lag time for a diversion. It's up to you to determine the method you want to use to compute the lag time and any losses for the diversion. Normally you wouldn't have the same lag time for all the diversions in your watershed unless all the diversions have the same length, slope, and geometry. It would be best to either calculate the lag time manually or to use the Muskingum-Cunge method where you define a diversion length, slope, and the channel geometry. HMS will compute the lag time if you use this method. There are not really any good tools for calculating the lag time for a diversion in WMS for an HMS model. The diversions would have to have the same geometry, length, roughness, and slope for the lag time to be the same. The impact the lag time has on the model calculations is that the hydrograph downstream of the diversion is routed based on the lag time. This means if the lag time for a diversion reach is 30 minutes, it takes 30 additional minutes for the hydrograph to reach the downstream end of the diversion and the hydrograph peak is translated by 30 minutes. There's also a storage attenuation of the hydrograph that occurs along the diversion reach that will decrease the peak flow when the hydrograph is routed using some of the HMS routing methods. Chris
  13. HEC HMS extremely insensitive to changes in input.

    I'm not sure why it's saying the Snyder method. My version of HMS actually did not show the same screen as yours. I wonder what version of HMS you're using. I'm using version 4.1. Send an email to or call Aquaveo Tech support if you want somebody here to look at your model and possibly help you. As far as the style sheets and the reports menu, it's complicated to use. A simple search on google for "Reports menu HMS style sheets" turns up some good results. The best ones I've found are from HEC here and another one here. You could just modify the style sheets included on these sites as needed. Figuring out what names to use in the style sheets and the format is the hard part. I don't have a good source for that. Hope this helps, let me know if you're able to figure out anything with the kinematic wave routing. You could always use the Snyder or Clark transform or just the SCS transform if nothing else works and if that option is available to you. Chris
  14. Lakes and HEC-HMS

    Ayman98, I do not recommend using the "lake" polygon attribute in the drainage coverage. If you need to define a lake, just define a basin as you normally would (the basin would include the lake, but the lake would not be represented by a polygon or arcs in your watershed) and then convert the basin's outlet point to a "reservoir" type by going to the hydrologic modeling module, right-clicking on the outlet, and then select Add | Reservoir. Then define your HMS reservoir data in the HMS Properties dialog. There are several ways of defining a reservoir in HMS. In general, you need some sort of storage-capacity-discharge curve that is a plot of the volume of water in the reservoir and the outflow from the reservoir at different elevations. There are tools in WMS to help you generate these curves. To get to the tools, Select the reservoir outlet and then select Calculators | Detention Basins to define your storage capacity-discharge curves and then map the curves to the HMS model when you're done. Hope this helps, Chris
  15. Injection wells/artificial recharge structure in HEC-HMS

    Ayman98, You can specify a sink in HMS. Any water that enters a sink just leaves the watershed and does not contribute to the watershed hydrograph. I don't know if this is what you want, but this may be an option for you if you have something like this. You could also model something like this using a diversion if you want some water to bypass the injection well and continue to the watershed outlet point. In either case, you could not model what's happening with the groundwater using HMS. You'd have to use some other model like GSSHA if you want to model surface-groundwater interaction. Or you could run HMS and take the hydrograph from the diversion or sink and use this as an injection well input to a groundwater model like MODFLOW. WMS has options to add sinks or diversions at outlet points. Just right-click on the outlet and select Add | Diversion or Add | Sink. When you export the HMS model, the diversion or sink will be included with your model. There's also a loss model in HMS called the SMA model that you might find useful for what you're doing. The SMA model divides the losses into several layers or "buckets", such as the canopy, soil, and a couple of percolation layers. Any water that exits the second percolation layer is assumed to go to the groundwater. You could use the output from the second percolation layer to determine how much water is entering the groundwater aquifer from your watershed. I don't know how you would use this method with an injection well like yours though. Hope this helps, Chris
×